Tears of the Desert: Taboos

Chapter 1

  • pg 7: The Evil Eye curse

Chapter 2

  • pg 19: Evil Eye curse quote ” Whenever Kadiga came round to ask me out to play, Grandma would scold us to cover our heads, or else the Evil Eye would get us”.

Chapter 3

  • pg 32: Hair curse. Quote  “Grandma was forever warning me of the danger of letting others get hold of my hair. If you wanted to curse someone there were evil Fakirs who could do this for you, but they would first ask for some of the person’s hair to ‘work’ the curse into”.
  • pg 35: Taboo on drinking, especially for women.

Chapter 4 : nothing

Chapter 5

  • pgs 52-65: screaming and crying while being cut is shameful
  • pg 56 quote: “Put this in your mouth. Bite down hard. And remember, you mustn’t scream or cry – it’s shameful. Be brave”.

Chapter 6: nothing

Chapter 7: nothing

Chapter 8: nothing

Chapter 9

  • pgs 110-111: Omer has the Evil Eye curse

Chapter 10

  • pg 122: Rathebe’s father turns down a request for her hand in marriage

Chapter 11: nothing

Chapter 12: nothing

Chapter 13: nothing

Chapter 14: nothing

Chapter 15: nothing

Chapter 16: nothing

Chapter 17: nothing

Chapter 18: nothing

Chapter 19: nothing

Chapter 20: nothing

Chapter 21: nothing

Chapter 22: nothing

Chapter 23: nothing

Chapter 24: nothing

Chapter 25: nothing

Chapter 26: nothing

Chapter 27: nothing

Chapter 28: nothing

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Tears of the Desert- Wounds and Illnesses

If there are chapters missing, that is because no illnesses or wounds were discussed in it.

Chapter 1- The Naming

  • Halima recalls a moment where a man is about to rape her, and while fighting the man, he stabs her in the leg with a knife (5).
  • After birth, a mother is considered too weak to go about her everyday life, so she is to lie in her bed and rest for 40 days (7).
  • Halima’s father, Abba, has two vertical scars on his head from the scarring processes that a Zaghawa child must go through. They were thought to prevent eye infections (9-10).

Chapter 2- Grandma’s Trip to the Lost Valley

  • Halima’s grandmother, Abu, also has two deep diagonal scars on her forehead, along with many others on her face (13).
  • Halima explains how her grandmother had given birth to a child, but it had died soon after. She said that this was not uncommon in their part of Africa (14).

Chapter 3- Moon-Bone Madness

  • Mohammed, Halima’s brother, was beat up by kids from another tribe. He came home with mud all over his face and scratch marks from head to toe (30).
  • Halima goes to her friend’s house and gets drunk for the first time (34).
  • Mohammed received his scarring from his mother and grandmother. They try to do this to Halima, but she kicks and screams until her grandmother lets her go (37).

Chapter 4- Mo, Omer, and Me

  • Halima’s mother wakes up with a pain in her ear, and the family is worried an insect may have crawled inside of it. To get the insect out, Abu decides to put gasoline in her ear. At first nothing happened, and then Halima’s mother started to cough, heaving, and clutching at her throat. She could hardly breathe, and she was getting weaker by the second (40).
  • She was taken to the hospital and was told that the gasoline had gone into her stomach and lungs.  She was allowed home after a while, and she was not allowed to expose her chest to any of the fire and smoke (40-41).
  • The family’s cowboy came into the village one afternoon bloody and torn and very scared. He had just been attacked by the Ahrao (50).

Chapter 5- The Cutting Time

  • While playing one day, a man reached out and ripped Halima’s white eyelash almost out of her eye. Halima’s eye was in a lot of pain, and had closed over completely.  After a week, the swelling went down and it was back to normal (52).
  • Halima had to undergo the “circumcision” that every Zaghawa girl must go through as a rite of passage. This is a major form of genital mutilation and it was extremely painful for Halima. She was horrifically cut by knives and without any pain medication whatsoever. Halima described the pain, saying that “The pain was so unbearable that it had taken over my whole head, driving me to the borders of insanity.” (56-58)
  • Whenever Halima would try to go to the bathroom it was unbearable for her.  Her legs were ties together so she could not walk, in order to help the healing process (58-59).
  • Halima mentions how many Zaghawa girls die during their cutting time simply from the pain, or have problems in the future having children (59).

Chapter 6- School Days

  • After Halima refuses to clean the side of the room that was the responsibility of an Arab girl, the teacher beats her with a broomstick on her legs (77).

Chapter 9- The White Eyelash Attack

  • Halima’s little brother, Omer, tries to cut off Halima’s white eyelash with a carving knife, cutting her eyelid very badly. After this attack, she was experiencing intense pains in her stomach and vomiting up all of her food (109-111).

Chapter 10- Cousins in Love

  • Halima witnesses brutal abuse of a black man by an Arab policeman. He punched his face, beat him with his baton, and bloodied the man so bad he almost died (124-125).

Chapter 14- Rumors of War

  • A method of healing was used for migraines and jaundice that involved burning the skin with a red-hot knife. Other harmful healing methods included the slicing open of a goiter to try and “drain” it. This could be a huge problem, making the patient prone to infection and/or bleeding to death (160-161).

Chapter 15- Medicine Woman

  • The Zaghawa medicine woman, Halima, became very ill. She could no longer treat herself and she knew that it was she was about to die. This is a time that they call “sinya nee.” (173)
  • When Halima gets a new job, she explains how there was, “an endless stream of blood and guts and horror, and the work was tough and exhausting.” (178)

Chapter 16- Accident and Emergency

  • Halima describes her time being spent exclusively on swabbing bloody wounds, stitching wounds, cleaning wounds, and casting broken limbs (179).
  • She was presented with two young boys who were very badly burned. Their father had been gunned down and they had been thrown into a burning hut alive. Halima explains how she cleans and dresses these wounds every morning (179-180).
  • A small Zaghawa boy had came into the clinic with the whole side of his face tore off by gunfire. He was missing an eye and he was very badly burned on his face (180).
  • Many, many children had come in due to war injuries. There were burns and disfigurements, and a ton of gunshot wounds. There was a particular boy that had come in that had been shot in the back once and then again in his body that was left to die (180). His father had found him and he was drifting in and out of consciousness. He was paralyzed, but the boy managed to survive thanks to Halima.
  • Halima becomes very nauseous and sick after she is taken and scared by Arabic police (188)

Chapter 17- Mission to Mazkhabad

  • Her first day on the job, Halima is presented with an older woman who was as thin a skeleton. She had yellowish eyes, and she also had “club finger,” a typical sign of liver failure where the fingernails curl over the fingers (196).
  • A boy is brought in to the clinic, with a large gash in his leg from a piece of tin that had sliced it open. He was bleeding very profusely, and Halima put a tourniquet on it to lessen the flow. She described that it was so bad she could see his thighbone through the cut muscle (198-199).

Chapter 18- Rebel Doctor

  • A rebel warrior brought himself in with a horrible calf wound. A bullet had passed clean through it, just missing his bone (203).
  • Halima was flooded in the clinic with rebel fighters all bearing gunshot wounds (204).
  • After a school was attacked by the Janjaweed, little girls were brought in with their uniforms bloodied and ripped, and they were crying for help (209-210).

Chapter 19- Black Dogs and Slaves

  • Halima brings the first girl into the clinic; her face had been bloodied from the butt of a rifle. She needed stitches.  The worst came though when Halima lifted up her uniform. She explained that the little girl’s thighs were covered in scratches and cut marks. It looked as though, “a pack of wild animals had been clawing at her.” (212)
  • The little girl had been circumcised like Halima, and the Arab policemen had ripped the little girl apart (213).
  • All of the little girls that were brought into the clinic had been circumcised and raped and fell victim to other brutal acts of sexual violence (215).

Chapter 20- They Come For Me

  • Halima is captured and brought to an Arab military camp where she is beaten terribly. She was kicked in the stomach, legs, and even her face. Her fingers were broken; hair was pulled, and tied up so that her arms were being torn from their sockets (223-225).
  • One of the Arab men stabs Halima in the leg (226).
  • Halima’s breast is cut open, and then the men take turns raping her (227).
  • While being abused, Halima was also burnt with cigarettes, and cut in many places with knifes from the men (227).
  • Grandma Sumah had passed away from a stroke (231).

Chapter 22- The Devil Horsemen

  • After the Zaghawa village is attacked by Arab armies, Halima describes the people left behind that were torn apart by the bullets but had still managed to survive (241).
  • Halima finds her friend Kadiga’s sister shot dead in her home, with her newborn baby beside her thrown into a fire (243).
  • Survivors of the attack were injured with gunshot wounds, burns, shrapnel poisoning, and stabbings (244).
  • There was a woman who had been mistaken for dead, who was in a state of shock and the trauma was killing her (245).

Chapter 23- A Time of Fear

  • There were children in the village after the attack with burns covering their entire body. Their skin was blistering off (250).
  • Many women who had lost everything lost their minds, hugging themselves, and rocking back and forth constantly (250).

Chapter 25- The Hostel of Despair

  • Halima becomes depressed in the hostel. She had no exercise and little food, and she was becoming very lonely (278).

Chapter 26- In London, In Love

  • Halima became very sick because of an infection in her stomach (282).

Chapter 27- Breaking the Silence

  • Halima becomes pregnant, and as it progresses she becomes very weak and tired (287).
  • She finds out that she has chronic anemia, and that she was bleeding inside of the womb. She was constantly losing blood which was very serious (287).
  • Halima was hospitalized because she was so weak, and there was where she gave birth to her son.  The placenta was stuck to the baby, and she was bleeding very heavily. She was told that she would have to give birth by caesarian, but her pregnancy was too far along and after a while she had the baby naturally. Halima passed out during this, because of the loss of blood (289).



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Tears of the Desert – Community Events

Chapter 1:

Pg. 6 – Naming Ceremony: A child’s name must be announced to the tribe within 7 days of birth

Chapter 2:

N/A

Chapter 3:

Pg. 32 – The kids gather to play the “moon-bone” game while parents watched and cheered for their children.

Chapter 4:

N/A

Chapter 5:

Pg. 55 – Halima’s circumcision: A passage from girlhood to womanhood. The women of the tribe gather to celebrate and honor Halima in her coming right of passage.

Chapter 6:

Pg. 73 – The people of Hashma gather to watch the Khawajat, or white people.

Chapter 7:

N/A

Chapter 8:

Pg. 102 –The Zaghawa people gather every night to watch the TV.

Chapter 9:

Pg. 113-144: Halima’s families each hold a celebration to honor here success in school.

Chapter 10:

Pg. 117: The Wedding: The family travels to a neighboring village in order to attend their cousin’s wedding. An extravagant bride-price has been made, the head-shaving ritual has taken place, and the well known tricks and fighting for more bride-price take place. Wihtout fighting the Zighawa people would find the wedding boring

Chapter 11:

Pg. 131: The community attends the burial of Halima’s grandfather. A muslim must be buried on the day of his death

Chapter 12:

N/A

Chapter 13:

N/A

Chapter 14:

N/A

Chapter 15:

Pg. 169 – Many people of the tribe gather to receive help from and witness the healing power of Halima.

Chapter 16:

N/A

Chapter 17:

N/A

Chapter 18:

N/A

Chapter 19:

N/A

Chapter 20:

N/A

Chapter 21:

N/A

Chapter 22:

Pg. 248: Those remaining in the tribe gather for supper. They would listen to the stories of their tribe members and allow the collective mourning to continue.

Chapter 23:

N/A

Chapter 24:

N/A

Chapter 25:

N/A

Chapter 26:

Pg. 284 – The Zaghawa people in England bring gifts and celebrate Halima’s presence in the new community and the marriage between Sharif and her.

Chapter 27:

Pg. 290 – Halima holds her own naming ceremony for her first-born son.

Pg. 294 – People in England gather to her Halima’s story on the horrors of Sudan, and help take a stand against her deportation.

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Tears of the Desert: Children and their roles in the community, their attitudes, etc.

Chapter 1

P6-In the Zaghawa tribe, children must be named within seven days of birth.

P7-A tradition of the tribe is to name children after their grandparents.

Chapter 2

P14-Children, especially Halima at this age, find the traditional cuts/scars fascinating and beautiful.

P17-Halima’s mother tells the story of Grandma Sumah’s father who had so many wives who had given birth to so many children that he didn’t know their names. He would have to ask “Who is your mother?” in an attempt to place the child.

P18-Children are to sleep in the women’s or men’s huts with the elders and other relatives, not with the parents who have their own separate hut.

P18-Children’s clothing: Simple styles.

For girls a cotton dress that covered shoulder to ankle, bare feet, and beeri hairstyle. (Beeri-one braid parallel to the forehead and the rest braided down the head to the back.) No Bob Marley styled hair!

P18-20-Halima and her friend, Kadiga are beginning to realize what skin color and hairstyles are more attractive in their culture.

P19-“Men of our tribe preferred lighter, more reddish skinned women” & “Above all else Zaghawa men prized a woman’s long hair.”

P20-Children’s chores: firewood gatherers and carriers, and water gatherers.

P26-Expectations of children (daughters especially): “In Zaghawa culture, there was nothing worse than the thought that your daughter might fail to find, or keep, her own Zaghawa man.”

Chapter 3

P28-Children’s chores: Halima is in charge of making the yogurt. She milks the cows, store the milk in a tagro, and then shake the container until the mixture would separate into butter and yogurt.

P30-Firstborn Zaghawa males are named after the Islamic prophet, Mohammed.

P30-Sibling rivalries: Halima’s younger brother, Mohammed, gets to sleep with their mother and soon seems to be her favorite. Halima grows envious.

P31-Children of the village use their imagination to entertain themselves. They jump on their father’s land rover, play the shadow game, make rag dolls from old clothes, straw, wool and even hair, mold horses and cars out of clay, and play the infamous moon bone game.

P36-Halima now fears the scarring that she had once wanted so badly.

Chapter 4

P42-In Zaghawa tradition, parents name their second-born son the father’s surname.  In this case, Omer.

P44-45-Children to children interaction: play fighting, tree climbing and adventuring.

P45-Chlidren’s chores: Planting the sorghum and maize in the fields.

P45-Sibling rivalry over who can plant the fastest.

Chapter 5

P54-For most Zaghawa children before the age of eight, the only education comes from the Koran.

P54-Before receiving formal education girls must go through their own circumcision which represents the change from girlhood to womanhood. Girls are usually around the ages 8-10 when this happens.

P60-Most children go to schools where no uniforms and shoes were needed and class was held under a tree. Only the wealthy could afford Halima’s type of schooling.

Chapter 6

P69-71-Halima and other black girls notice the hostility and differneces between the cultures in school. (Arabs vs. Africans)

P71-72-School enforces cleanliness in their students. The headmaster inspects nails, clothes, faces and hair. If she finds any dirt she cracks you over the head with a stick.

P72-Though claiming to “be growing up” the girls still play on the playground participating in games such as hop-scotch and sock-ball.

P73-Children in awe when seeing the khawajati, white people, at the local market.

P74-Discrimination amongst the Arab and African children.

Chapter 7

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 8

P94-Corruption in administration when dealing with students of Arab and Native African tribe descent.

P99-Halima, as well as the other black girls realize that the Arabs and African students grew up in two completely different worlds. Africans grew up in villages with mud huts whereas the Arabs live in cities with comfortable houses with running water and electricity. They realize that the best is always reserved for the Arabs. Also, they realize that most Arabs have blacks as servants.

P100-Halima loses her naivety of village life vs. city life. She realizes that the attitudes of her childhood friends have completely changed and they view her as an outsider.

P103-Halima’s family gets a TV and the every child ends up in their hut watching the magical box.

Chapter 9

P108-Sibling rivalry/mutiny: When siblings feel that one is loved more than the other.

Omer and Mo feel that Halima is treated differently and finally come to the conclusion that it must be her white eyelash that gives her all of this great fortune. They turn on their sister, pin her down and attempt to slash the eyelash with a kitchen knife.

Chapter 10

P120-Child’s job: Drummer at the wedding has a boy that collects money for him.

Chapter 11

P128-Children’s desires to fulfill their parents’ wishes: Halima faces her final days in secondary school and studies hard so she can be the top of her class and get into a medical program at the university to make her father proud.

Chapter 12

P146-Remembering childhood: Halima realizes how awful it is that her tribe and family made her go through with the circumcision. She feels that this took away her girlhood and child innocence.

Chapter 13

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 14

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 15

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 16

P180-Child victims: Halima tends to many girls who were attacked and gang raped by the Janjaweed.

Chapter 17

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 18

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 19

P211-213-Child victims: Halima once again treats the young school girls who were attacked, beaten, and gang raped by Janjaweed.

Chapter 20

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 21

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 22

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 23

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 24

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 25

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 26

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 27

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

Chapter 28

No Discussion of Children and their roles, etc.

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Tears of the Desert- Healthcare and Healing Practices

Ch. 1

Page 8- Halima was cut open, she bled, became infected .

Page 8- Hijabs potent spell prayers

Page 8- Fakirs- prepare to protect people

Page 9- Boy had scars on his head

Page 10- This was cut when the boy was little

Ch. 2

Page 13- Scarring makes women beautiful. Hours of cutting with a razor blade.

Page 20-21- Double Medicine gathering. Grandma would stop at trees and pick things up that would be good to cure Malaria and help prevent getting it.

Ch.3

N/A

Ch.4

Page 39- The mothers ear was hurting. The grandmother poured hot sesame oil inside the ear. Then poured gas into the ear.

Ch.5- Taihree- “unbearable pain” sewn up only a tiny hole of the circumcision.

Ch.5-

Page 57-Antibotics, broke then put them put powder over area that was wounded locked the thighs together.

Ch.6

N/A

Ch.7

Page 89- Short supply of water so sesame oil was used to cleanse and moisturize water

Ch.8

N/A

Ch.9

Page 111- Potion, power of hijabs

Ch.10

N/A

Ch.11

N/A

Ch.12

N/A

Ch.13

N/A

Ch.14

N/A

Ch.15

Page 170- Doctor. Helping patients (Halima) Patient was pregnant with a set of twins.

Ch.16

N/A

Ch.17

N/A

Ch.18

N/A

Ch.19

Page 213- Girls came into clinic and they were all circumcised. In much pain. Needed help and received help.

Ch.20

N/A

Ch.21

Page 234- Halima started working in a health clinic around her village.

Ch. 22

N/A

Ch.23

N/A

Ch.24

N/A

Ch. 25

Page 278- Halima was ill and sent to a local GP. She was in the hospital for three weeks and was on antidepressants.

Ch.26

Page 282- Halima had an infection in her stomach.

Ch.27

Page 287- She was diagnosed with anemia and was sent to London to see a specialists, also was pregnant.

Page 289- Even though she had all of these troubles her baby was born naturally.

Ch.28

N/A

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Tears of the Desert: Exchange Systems/ Money/ Barter/ etc… in Sudan

Tears of the Desert: Exchange Systems/ Money/ Barter/ etc… in Sudan

Chapter 1:

  • Pg. 7: When a child was to be named a feast would be held where food and other gifts were brought to share with all of the village members.
  • Pg. 9: Halima’s father managed to buy an old Land Rover with his money.
  • Pg. 11: Halima’s Father, “Abba”, made a down payment on the dowry he would be paying for his wife to be’s hand in marriage.

Chapter 2:

  • Pg. 17: For many Zaghawa families gifts are given at weddings and births in the form of pigeons.
  • Pg. 24: There was a service that would collect fire wood and drive by the villages calling out to those who wanted to purchase firewood.
  • Pg. 25: Like the firewood, a man would do the same selling water of a donkey cart banging a drum letting people know he was there if villagers needed water to buy.

Chapter 3:

  • Pg. 28: The Zaghawa chief first proposed a trade for his armored car and then the two sat down and negotiated a deal of peace.

Chapter 4:

  • Pg. 43: The kids were instructed by their Grandma that once they had saved enough money they should purchase gold.
  • Pg. 51: When Grandma’s goats were stolen Abba went out to the market place and purchased new ones.

Chapter 5:

  • Pg. 64: Halima’s father had to pay fees for Halima to have a reserved spot in the big school away from the village.

Chapter 6:

  • Pg. 74: While at school, instead of packing lunches Halima bought her lunches from the Felatta woman’s stall.

Chapter 7:

  • Pg. 88: When Halima’s father came to her school he met her teachers and gave them a small gift of money and then made a donation to the head mistress toward school funds.

Chapter 8:

  • N/A

Chapter 9:

  • Pg. 113: When Halima was announced for making honor roll she was given a gold embossed Koran and some prize money.

Chapter 10:

  • Pg. 117: At the Halima’s close cousins wedding a dowry had to be paid in both money and a number of animals and more money was later given after controversy with the bride’s family not letting her leave to go to the wedding.
  • Pg. 119: The drummer at the party was paid in advance as well as through tips while he played at the wedding.

Chapter 11:

  • Pg. 129: The secondary school Halima attended would get more pay bonuses based off the number of students they got accepted into college.

Chapter 12:

  • Pg. 138: During Halima’s train ride to university every time the train stopped vendors would sell all kinds of things through the windows of the train.

Chapter 13:

  • Pg. 157: For the university students that joined the Jihad as exchange for joining the fight they wouldn’t have to take exams.

Chapter 14:

  • N/A

Chapter 15:

  • N/A

Chapter 16:

  • N/A

Chapter 17:

  • N/A

Chapter 18:

  • Pg. 201: Aisha did a little trade in the village marketplace by selling ghou, the flour used to make acidah.

Chapter 19:

  • N/A

Chapter 20:

  • N/A

Chapter 21:

  • N/A

Chapter 22:

  • N/A

Chapter 23:

  • Pg. 256: Halima and the truck driver taking her to Khartoum negotiated a price for travel and then the driver was paid.

Chapter 24:

  • Pg. 265: The agent that helped Halima escape was paid in money as well as gold that he would use to sell for more money.

Chapter 25:

  • N/A

Chapter 26:

  • Pg. 283: Sharif (Halima’s Husband), bought her a “pay-as-you-go mobile phone so they could stay in touch.

Chapter 27:

  • N/A

Chapter 27:

  • N/A

Chapter 27:

  • N/A

Chapter 28:

  • N/A
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Tears of the Desert-Infrastructure

Chapter 1

p. 6 Father tells Halima about his work and travels. “buying and selling cattle, goats, and camels,…travels across the deserts and mountains of Darfur.”

Chapter 2

p. 20 Rivers flow only during the rainy season and drinking water comes from “a well in the village center.”

p. 24 Irrigation ditch is full of warm, brownish water.

p. 25 A man in the village filled up an oil tank with water during the night. In the mornings he went around selling the water to people. “…he’d use his standard water container, a koii, to measure out the amount of water you wanted.”

Chapter 3

No infrastructure was discussed.

Chapter 4

No infrastructure was discussed.

Chapter 5

pg. 62 The road is described as being “a series of rough tracks”

Chapter 6

pg. 69 Halima goes to school.

pg. 73 Halima talks about the route her and Mona took to get home. “Our route took us through the bustling marketplace and past the central mosque…”

Chapter 7

pg. 84 Halima is talking about how when an airplane flies over they shout “Khawajat! Kawajat! Kawajat!” and “Plane Number Three! Plane Number Three! This is Plane Number Three!” Kawajat: white people.

pg 87 Halima mentions that her village only washes on Fridays because the water supply was short.

Chapter 8

pg. 101 Halima’s father returns with a T.V.

pg. 104 Halima mentions that many children in the village came to watch their television. Her family’s favorite cartoon was Tom and Jerry.

pg. 105 “My father was an avid watcher of anything to do with race and politics in South Africa.”

Chapter 9

pg. 112 Halima talks about how Mousa was flown all the way to Nigeria, to see the Fakirs. (Flown=use of an airplane)

Chapter 10

pg 117 Halima’s family had to travel to a wedding “in a big truck that doubled as a the village bus.”

pg. 121 Halima’s family returns home from the wedding by a donkey cart.

Chapter 11

pg. 128 Exam results were announced on national television.

pg. 132 Kadima’s uncle tells halima that he had heard her name on the radio.

(television and radio are a form of communication infrastructure)

Chapter 12

pg 137 Halima takes a train to her university.

pg 138 When Halima and her father got off the train, they got a taxi.

pg 141 “A tee-lined avenue led into campus from the main road.”

pg. 141 Halima talks about how there were regular power cuts.

pg. 142 “There was no running water in the dorms.” They had to get buckets of water from the well.

Chapter 13

pg. 150 “I had taken the train to Hashama, and the truck back to the village.”

Chapter 14

pg. 161 There was an attack at the airport in El Fasher.  Several airplanes were destroyed.

Chapter 15

No infrastructure was discussed.

Chapter 16

pg. 182 Halima mentions that in her village “there is lack of good water and little health provision. And the government does little to help.”

pg 183 Halima is asked to go with some policemen.

pg 184 The police are described as being “notoriously brutal” and “all-powerful.”

(police are a form of service)

Chapter 17

pg 190 Halima receives a letter from the Health Ministry to begin working at the regional clinic in Mazkhabad.

pg 192 Halima travels to Mazkhabad by truck and describes the road outside of the city. “the road became rough and difficult, the truck bouncing through potholes, throwing people off of their feet.”

Chapter 18

pg. 205 “radiotelephone” – a radio that had a cable antenna hung up in a tree. It allowed for telephone calls to any number in the country. Most of the time it didn’t work.

pg. 206 The Mazkhabad police come to the clinic and rudely demand a list of patients from Halima.

Chapter 19

pg. 218 Government soldiers surrounded the school where the girls were raped by the janjaweed. Anyone who came too close was shot at.

pg. 220 Two men from the United Nations arrived to ask about the school raping.

Chapter 20

pg. 223 Halima is taken to a military camp.

Chapter 21

No infrastructure discussed.

Chapter 22

pg. 239 A helicopter is referred to as “Airplane with a fan.”

pg. 245 SLA- Sudan Liberation Army- rebel fighters.

pg. 245 The livestock and crops had been destroyed by the Janjaweed.

Chapter 23

pg. 249 “Even the village water pump had been torn to pieces.”

pg. 249 The Arab tribes were poorer than Halima’s village.

pg. 254 Halima left her village. She walked along the railroad track; hiding from every train that passed by.

Chapter 24

pg. 261 The road is described as being rough.

pg. 268 Halima takes a plane out of Sudan.

Chapter 25

pg. 271 Halima takes a taxi to her destination from the airport.

pg. 272 The Taxi driver tells Halima to go ask the policemen for Asylum.

pg. 276 Halima is sent to the asylum hostel.

pg. 278 Halima is sent to see the GP, and then is sent to the hospital.

p. 279 Halima gets a lawyer.

Chapter 26

pg.281 Halima goes to the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture.

pg. 281 Halima begins an English course at a local college.

pg. 283 Halima and her husband take a “red London bus to Shepherd’s Bush Market.”

pg. 283 Sharif had attended university of Khartoum.

Chapter 27

pg. 288 Halima takes a train to London to prepare an appeal.

pg. 292 “I remembered my father tuning his little radio into the BBC World Service.”

pg.292 Halima shares her story with BBC and it is broadcasted on television.

Chapter 28

pg. 299 The policemen take Sharif.

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